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Phytocannabinoid medical and wellbeing research

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A lovely female Cannabis indica plants. These are often good for pain relief producing a nice body stone.
Male Cannabis sativa plants in late flowering stages.


Cannabis is the oldest and most versatile medicine known to man.

Cannabis sativa and Cannabis indica are the main cannabis variants though most strains are mixes of these. A third cannabis line is the Cannabis ruderalis, a rugged nothern cannabis that has adapted to flower even under northern long summer days.

Endocannabinoid receptors[edit]

Main article in wikipedia Endocannabinoid system

Human body contains 2 types of endocannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2.

CB1 receptors predominantly located in the nervous system, connective tissues, gonads, glands, and organs and [1]

CB2 receptors, primarily found in the immune system and also present in the spleen, liver, heart, kidneys, bones, blood vessels, lymph cells, endocrine glands, and reproductive organs. [1]

Endocannabinoids[edit]

Anandamide, an endogenous ligand of CB1 and CB2

Endocannabinoids are produced by our own bodies from Arachidonic acid or Omega-6 fatty acid[2].

The two main endocannabinoids are Anandamide and 2-AG.

Anandamide[edit]

Anandamide was discovered in 1992 and it binds to both CB1 and CB2 receptors. The name comes from the Sanskrit word 'Ananda' meaning 'bliss' and amide from its chemistry.

It has been referred to as the endocannabinoid version of THC.

2-AG[edit]

2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is an endogenous agonist of the CB1 receptor
.

2-AG was discovered in 1994-1995.

Links about 2-AG

N-Arachidonoyl dopamine[edit]

N-Arachidonoyl dopamine discovered in 2000.

2-Arachidonyl glyceryl ether[edit]

2-Arachidonyl glyceryl ether discovered in 2001.

Virodhamine[edit]

Virodhamine discovered in 2002

Lysophosphatidylinositol[edit]

Lysophosphatidylinositol is a contender to be the 6th endocannabinoid.


Phytocannabinoids[edit]

Rare 11-leafer Cannabis sativa

Many people may know the 2 most prevalent phytocannabinoids, THC and CBD.

List of known phytocannabinoids from Wikipedia:

THC[edit]

Tetrahydrocannabinol is a partial agonist of CB1 located mainly in the central nervous system, and the CB2 receptor mainly expressed in cells of the immune system.

Tetrahydrocannabinol is the psychoactive compound that brings the 'high' most recreational users are chasing.

THCA[edit]

Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid THCA is the what cannabis plants produce to fend of insects from harming it. In pure form THCA is a clear translucent crystalline of white color.

THC is produced from the raw THCA by a process called decarboxylation. Basically means to heat the stuff over certain temperature.

THCA found in raw marijuana apparently has some health enhancing properties. The issue is being researched.

CBD[edit]

Cannabidiol has very low affinity for the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors receptors but acts as an indirect antagonist of cannabinoid agonists.

Cannabidiol has the most medical applications of all phytocannabinoids.

“Cannabidiol has little affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors but acts as an indirect antagonist of cannabinoid agonists.[3]
~ Wikipedia on Cannabidiol


CBDA[edit]

Cannabidiolic Acid is the raw form. Decarboxylating CBDA yields CBD.

CBN[edit]

Cannabinol

CBG[edit]

Cannabigerol

“Cannabigerol has been shown to promote apoptosis in cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth in mice. It acts as an α2-adrenergic receptor agonist, 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, and CB1 receptor antagonist.[4] It also binds to the CB2 receptor.[4]
~ Wikipedia on Cannabigerol


CBC[edit]

Cannabichromene

CBL[edit]

Cannabicyclol

CBV[edit]

Cannabivarin

THCV[edit]

Tetrahydrocannabivarin can be used to inhibit appetite.

Links about THCV

CBDV[edit]

Cannabidivarin

CBCV[edit]

Cannabichromevarin

CBGV[edit]

Cannabigerovarin

CBGM[edit]

Cannabigerol Monomethyl Ether

CBE[edit]

Cannabielsoin

CBT[edit]

Cannabicitran


Treating somatic issues[edit]

Cannabis can be applied to treat a wide assortment of illnesses. In this case it is called medical cannabis.

Due to the inbuilt default to always take the safe route and also to backup the back of your fellow MD colleague the Wikipedia does not yield the right infos on how useful and versatile a medication cannabis is.

Research has been held back by arcane laws even as cannabis is the oldest medicine known to man and it should be gladly appreciated and not outlawed because of big pharma interests.

Pain treatment[edit]

“You just don't feel like thinking about the pain.”
~ Apotheker Jukeboksi on somatic pain relief with cannabis


“There is more to it than that.”
~ Science on above quote


Cannabis is anti-inflammatory which helps relieve some of the pain.

Epilepsy[edit]

Full extract cannabis oil in a syringe for easy dosing and travel is usually administered in drops to the gums or under the tongue.

Cannabis can be used to treat epilepsy.

Asthma[edit]

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis[edit]

Cannabis helps with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) also known as Lou Gehrig's disease and motor neurone disease (MND).

Autoimmune diseases[edit]

Cannabis helps with many autoimmune diseases.

Links about autoimmune diseases and cannabis

Rheumatoid arthritis[edit]

Cannabis helps with Rheumatoid arthritis.

Links about Rheumatoid arthritis and cannabis

Lupus[edit]

Cannabis helps with Systemic lupus erythematosus

Coeliac disease[edit]

Cannabis helps with Coeliac disease.

Psoriasis[edit]

Cannabis helps with Psoriasis when applied externally.

Type 1 diabetes[edit]

Multiple sclerosis[edit]

Cannabis is very good against Multiple sclerosis.


Cancers[edit]

Internet is rife with stories about winning the battle against cancer with the help of phytocannabinoids. What does the science say?

  1. Anti-proliferative - cannabis is against tumor growth [5]
  2. Anti-metastatic - cannabis is against cancer spreading to other parts in the body because of metastatic activity[5]
  3. Anti-angiogenetic - cannabis is against new blood vein growth to tumor[5]
  4. Apoptotic - cannabis causes cancer cells to programmedly kill themselves via Apoptosis. [5]
  5. Pain relief - cannabis works very well against the somatic and nonsomatic pains brought on by cancer.
  6. Appetite stimulator - cannabis helps maintain a good appetite.
  7. Anti-nauseatic - cannabis helps with the chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. [6] if you receive chemotherapy.

Phytocannabinoids are harmless to healthy cannabinoid receptor containing cells.

Studies about cannabis and cancer

Testimonies about cannabis and cancer

Links about cannabis and cancer

Videos on the Internet about phytocannabinoid treatment of cancers

Cristina Sánchez is one of the foremost researchers into the anti-cancer qualities of cannabinoids of our time.

Leukemia[edit]

There are 2 main types of Leukemia:

Links about Lympoid and Myeloid leukemia and cannabis

Links about Lymphoid leukemia and cannabis

Links about Myeloid leukemia and cannabis

Prostate cancer[edit]

Cannabis helps with prostate cancer.

  • herb.co/2017/01/13/prostate-cancer-cannabis/

Brain cancer[edit]


Treating non-somatic issues[edit]

Cannabis can help with various non-somatic problems such as psychiatry, depression and PTSD.

PTSD[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 https://patients4medicalmarijuana.wordpress.com/2017/07/06/how-and-why-your-brain-makes-its-own-cannabinoids/
  2. https://wakeup-world.com/2014/09/08/the-endocannabinoid-system-and-how-thc-cures-cancer/
  3. Mechoulam, Raphael; Peters, Maximilian; Murillo-Rodriguez, Eric; Hanuš, Lumír O. (2007). "Cannabidiol – Recent Advances". Chemistry & Biodiversity 4 (8): 1678–92. PMID 17712814. doi:10.1002/cbdv.200790147. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 Cascio, MG; Gauson, LA; Stevenson, LA; Ross, RA; Pertwee, RG (2010). "Evidence that the plant cannabinoid cannabigerol is a highly potent α2-adrenoceptor agonist and moderately potent 5HT1A receptor antagonist". British Journal of Pharmacology 159 (1): 129–41. PMC 2823359. PMID 20002104. doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2009.00515.x. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 http://herb.co/2016/08/25/cannabis-kills-cancer/
  6. http://herb.co/2017/01/03/cannabis-chemotherapy-induced-nausea/